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WHAT IF IT IS NOT “JUST” A COUGH?
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WHAT IF IT IS NOT “JUST” A COUGH?

WHAT IF IT IS NOT “JUST” A COUGH?   It was Friday early in the afternoon and I was already dreaming of my free weekend, when one of the technicians came to get me: “Afrodita came to you for a check-up.” I got a bit angry, as I told Afrodita’s owners at the last telephone...

NOT EVERYONE IS A SURGEON …
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NOT EVERYONE IS A SURGEON …

They say, it is hard to be good at everything. Well … there are people, who give us the feeling, they are outstanding in everything they do. But most of us are simply such, that we are good at some things and at others … a little less. It is like that with me and...

WHY BELIEVE IN OKEAN AND ATTEND THEIR COURSES?
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WHY BELIEVE IN OKEAN AND ATTEND THEIR COURSES?

Nowadays we all (some more, others less) are struggling with how to spend our money wisely. How much are we willing to pay, to get what we want or need, or to learn something useful. We want to receive something in return for the money invested and we are mostly interested in “best value for...

WHAT IS YOUR EMERGENCY?
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WHAT IS YOUR EMERGENCY?

I am sitting in the office, because I don’t have patients at the moment. Suddenly, I hear a technician, calling from the ground floor: »Emergencyyyyyyyy!!!« I quickly stand up, take a deep breath and run down the stairs, directly to the examination room. I open the door, ready to face the animal, that needs my...

The beginning of veterinary path: from theory to practice
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The beginning of veterinary path: from theory to practice

When a young graduate of veterinary medicine starts to work in a small animal practice he’s usually very confident and full of theoretical knowledge. But what he lacks is experiences or as older colleagues would call it: »intuition« or »gut feeling«. And with first patients start first frustrations and pressures that young vet needs to go through. Let’s imagine a few situations.     • A dog comes to a veterinary clinic because of vomiting and diarrhea. Did he just eat some rubbish on his walk and would be o.k. tomorrow (with or without treatment) or is this a sign of a more serious disease process? How many diagnostic tests should be done? Bloodwork, urine analysis, maybe diagnostic imaging? In which order? (Let’s keep in mind we are spending owner’s money and we are not supposed to do any unnecessary tests). On the clinical examination, does this dog really have a painful abdomen or is this just a case of a nervous dog that reacts to every interaction with a veterinarian?     • Early spring – season of a kennel cough. Patient after patient comes with the same anamnesis: »Dog started coughing all of a sudden and at the end, there is some retching. It could be something stuck in his throat.« First patients get proper clinical examination but after a 10th patient from the neighborhood with the same clinical signs in the same day, let’s admit it. It gets boring. And at the end of the shift, half an hour before leaving with full head, empty stomach and full urinary bladder arrives an old dog that coughs a bit differently. For a young vet, it might be misleading that this is another case of a kennel cough and treats him rutinely but this dog might die due to undiagnosed cardiac disease and pulmonary edema.    • Owners bring in an outdoor cat that is losing weight but they can’t tell any history. They don’t know if she’s eating (because she’s sharing food with other cats) or if she has any other signs of disease, they don’t even know how old is she. And on top of it, they tell in advance that they won’t be able to give her any medications at home. What now when it can’t be done »by the book«? The cat is extremely aggressive, it is impossible to do a clinical examination. Is it safe to sedate her to take blood? What if it has chronic kidney disease and the owners might sue the veterinarian for medical error? Why take all the risk if it could just be the case of sarcopenia of an old cat?    This kind of frustrations fade away with years and professional life...

“SECOND OPINION”
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“SECOND OPINION”

A client comes into my examination room: »We have already seen some other veterinarian and they have ruined our dog! We spent so much money and came nowhere, actually the condition got even worse. Now we came to you, we want you to cure our dog.« … Ugh … Probably we all have experienced something...

Veterinary history
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Veterinary history

Veterinary medicine has crossed a long, revolutionary road since its beginnings, from few thousands of years BC to modern veterinary clinician who has a wide variety of skills and tools available and who always strives to improve and upgrade his knowledge. Although its main focus is on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease in non-human...

Internal medicine
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Internal medicine

As a veterinarian, you got into the field of medicine mostly for one reason—because you care about animals. In order to enhance and extend their lives, there are times when primary care veterinarians must turn to a trusted partner for added expertise, education, specialty advice or access to the latest and greatest technology. The primary...

Why the future belongs to clinicians with strong business acumen
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Why the future belongs to clinicians with strong business acumen

The competition Once upon a time, small veterinary practices competed with the other small guy down the street. Those days are long behind us. Several decades ago, the first veterinary chain emerged in the USA. Since then, Banfield, VCA, NVA, VetCor etc have bought and built hundreds of clinics. In the UK, a number of...

Neurology
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Neurology

We are pleased to announce the first of serial OKEAN Veterinary Neurology Courses from 07 – 08 of July 2018 in Belgrade, Pančevo. Our goal is to provide a forum for addressing innovations, issues and complications in veterinary neurology. Designed for veterinarians and neurology specialists, OKEAN neurology meetings will develop and broaden our knowledge and...